Monthly Archives: November 2015

Oman petchem company to award $4.5bn contracts

cbiState-owned Oman Oil Refineries and Petroleum Industries Comopany (Orpic) said it had finalised negotiations with preferred bidders for $4.5 billion worth of contracts to build a major plastics complex in the sultanate.

The four engineering, procurement and contracting packages will be completed in four years, with plants to be commissioned in 2019, Orpic said in a statement on Wednesday.

The Omani petrochemical company is set to award a contract for its plastics units to Italy’s Tecnimont, while a contract for natural gas liquids extraction facilities will be given to South Korea’s GS Engineering and Construction and Japan’s Mitsui & Co.

India’s Punj Lloyd will be awarded a contract for a major pipeline, Orpic said in a statement.

Earlier in the day, the Omani firm had awarded a $2.8 billion engineering, procurement and construction contract to a joint venture of Netherlands-headquartered Chicago Bridge & Iron Company (CB&I) and Taiwanese group CTCI Corporation for a steam cracker and utilities unit.

With 125 years of experience and the expertise of 54,000 employees, CB&I is a major player in the global infrastructure industry, while CTCI Corporation, founded in 1979 with headquarters in Taipei, is the largest EPC firm in Taiwan.

As per the contract, the CB&I venture will cover the Package One, which includes the steam cracker and associated utilities for the Liwa Plastics Industrial Complex Project in Sohar region, said a statement from the Dutch group.

The scope of work includes EPC for a grassroots 880-ktpa ethylene plant, pygas unit and MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) unit, as well as all the related off-sites and utilities.

CB&I said its scope of work also includes the construction of cryogenic equipment and atmospheric storage tanks and pipe spool fabrication.

As previously announced, the cracker will employ CB&I’s latest, proven ethylene technology, including highly selective SRT cracking heaters, and its innovative recovery section design, featuring low-pressure separation and mixed refrigeration, it added.

Commenting on the win, president and CEO Philip K. Asherman, said: “CB&I is pleased to have been selected for this significant project following the successful completion of the front end engineering and design of the Liwa Plastics Project for Orpic.”

“This new award builds upon the successful relationship between Orpic and CB&I and is a testament of our customer’s confidence in our experience and world-class project execution capabilities,” he added.

Orpic chief executive Musab Al Mahruqi said he expected to sign the contracts and financing deals by the end of this year.

“We are concluding discussions with export credit agencies, commercial banks and other relevant authorities and we expect to finalise the project funding plan by the end of the year, enabling us to award the respective EPC contracts,” he added.

Sourced by  ekomeri.com

TGE Marine to Deliver LNG Fuel Gas System for Massive Semi-Sub Crane

LNG fuel gas system

TGE Marine has been contracted to design and supply a LNG fuel gas system for the world’s largest offshore Semi-Submersible Crane Vessel with Sembcorp Marine for Dutch owner and operator Heerema. The system consists of eight vertical type C (prefabricated vacuum-isolated cryogenic tanks with a maximum allowable working pressure of 20 bar) LNG fuel tanks and four parallel fuel gas processing trains.

The delivery of all major components shall take place during Q1/Q2 2017.

“We are extremely pleased to have been selected by Sembcorp Marine and Heerema as engineering contractor”, commented Manfred Küver, TGE’s CEO,” as this order represents one of the largest contracts for LNG fuel packages in the market and underlines TGE’s leading market position in this new segment.”

Source by Ekomeri.com

Compressed natural gas carrier opens options for remote, marginal fields

Floating LNG vessels are emerging as a solution for harnessing gas from mid-size fields remote from offshore infrastructure. But there are many smaller offshore fields that do not justify the huge vessels that Shell and Petronas have commissioned for their current projects off Australia and Malaysia.

Fincantieri Offshore is working on an alternative concept for a ship-shaped compressed natural gas carrier – the CNG32000 – that could economically transport gas from stranded fields, compressed onboard to a pressure of 166 bar (2,407 psi), to a standard onshore unloading station or an existing regasification plant up to 1,500 mi (2,414 km) away.

Aside from providing a market for gas that might otherwise sit in the ground, the concept opens other potential benefits to offshore operators. One is avoiding the expense of installing a gas pipeline in the case of an oil field with associated gas, or having to re-inject the gas into the reservoir. Another is an economic means of disposing of gas from extended offshore well tests, ensuring compliance with restrictions on flaring.

There are numerous competing compressed natural gas (CNG) concepts, but according to Roberto Gonan, Head of Basic Design at Fincantieri Offshore, none are sufficiently matured to be considered for industrial production and vessel applications.

Fincantieri started work in earnest on the CNG32000 in 2013, initially studying various containment systems, methodologies, and ship configurations. It developed the concept in its present form in 2014, and has performed all work to date in-house. The ship is designed for a 20-year lifespan. Its main dimensions include an overall length of 220 m (722 ft); a molded breadth of 40 m (131 ft); a design draft of 7.2 m (23.6 ft); and a deadweight of around 6,700 metric tons (7,385 tons). Its total CNG transport capacity during a single voyage under standard conditions would be around 6.34 MMcm (223.9 MMcf) at 166 bar (2,407.6 psi) and a temperature of 25°C (77°F). This would be stored in pressure vessels grouped together in around 500 racks, stationed in 10 cargo holds (50 racks each).

CNG-carrier

Next to the cargo holds, the mid-body portion of the ship features a double hull and a double bottom, the inner part of which is used for ballast water tanks. Toward the aft section is the accommodation block, housing 21 crew members, in a superstructure above the main deck containing the engine room. Two 4.5-MW Azipod propulsion units combined with a bow thruster maintain the ship’s position during offshore tandem loading operations. Power is provided by three diesel generators with dual-fuel engines, each outputting around 4.3 MW. A back-up generator is stationed beside the accommodation block above the main deck.

The fore part of the vessel has a bulbous bow. Here the CNG handling system and compressor are located, above the main deck and forward of the cargo holds.

“Initially,” Gonan explained, “our main focus was on the compressed gas containment and cargo handling systems. We took into account and compared several different building materials, assessing physical properties and chemical compositions. We also looked at market availability aspects and economic applications.

“At present we are working on various issues. These include refining the thermo-fluid dynamic study, and assessing the ship’s different working conditions (loading/unloading/emergency release and so on). In addition, we are fine-tuning the prototype gas rack with the potential supplier of the pressure vessels, and we are finalizing safety aspects such as the FMEA analysis.”

The compression system has been designed to allow the ship to receive gas at various pressures and store it in metallic pressure vessels. The main components are the compressors, similar to those used in re-liquefaction systems in LNG carriers; thermal expansion valves; coolers; heaters; and remote control valves.

CNG-carrier

Some competing CNG concepts are based on storage pressure of 250-350 bar (3,626-5,076 psi), much higher than the current target for the CNG32000. According to Gonan, “there are both economic and energy benefits in compression between 140 and 160 bar [2,030-2,320 psi], compared with design pressures of 250 bar and above.

“Recent market studies for high-pressure vessels mostly foresee the application of materials not yet tested for CNG being transported at 250 bar and also envisage very high material costs. The solution we are proposing is intended to achieve the best compromise between the size of the vessel and the quantity of gas transported, at the same time eliminating upstream any possible issue relevant to time-to-market and proven technology. Our design is ready to build, and we want to use the highest quality standard components available today for the compression/storage system, in terms of pressure vessels, valves, pipes and so on.”

Gonan stressed that this is not a “one size fits all” concept. “Each project would need to be approached on a case-by-case basis. In addition, it is more practical to think in terms of a fleet of CNG vessels, rather than a single carrier, in order to maximize efficiency.”

Prior to entering the ship for compression, the produced gas would need to be pre-processed. Any hydrogen sulfide would have to be eliminated for safety reasons and any carbon dioxide would have to be kept below a certain percentage in order to guarantee the calorific properties of the gas and the heaviest hydrocarbons separated while under pressure.

“The compression system we have designed includes scrubber equipment dedicated to cleaning the gas of heavier hydrocarbons and liquid phases,” Gonan said. “Depending on the amount and characteristics of these quantities, the design of the pre-processing system will require different sizing, equipment, and configuration complexity.”

Arrangements for loading/unloading are provided in the forward part of the ship, comprising two manifolds with longitudinal bow connections suitable for offshore tandem loading. A hawser would be deployed to secure the ship and flexible hoses during cargo transfers. Transversal connections – two portside and two starboard – are also arranged forward for cargo transfer at the port quayside reception terminal.

Cargo loading/unloading would typically be completed in less than a day, Gonan estimated. “This assumes the gas would be received from the source (i.e the offshore production platform) at 60 bar, and delivered to the onshore terminal at 60 bar as well.” Offshore tandem loading operations could be performed even in rough seas, he added, although this remains to be validated in tank tests.

Aside from the gas containment system and associated equipment, the shape, layout, and facilities of the ship are similar to those of a standard LNG carrier, Gonan said. In terms of safety, “while LNG is a cryogenic liquid at -162°C [-259.6°F] carried at the ‘boiling point,’ and therefore continuously generating boil-off gas, the CNG is a stable fluid contained inside the pressure vessels at the ambient temperature condition. As for the CNG storage, the 166 bar pressure in our design is in line with, or even below that of the typical maximum used for transportation by road.”

On arrival at the reception terminal, the ship could directly transfer its cargo into the onshore network if the latter is configured to receive the gas within a reasonable timeframe. “In this case very limited facilities would be needed at the reception end,” Gonan suggested, “such as gas metering, odorization, and a Wobbe index correction system. Alternatively, the ship could be used as a storage facility, remaining at the terminal as long as necessary. If this is not possible or not economically viable, onshore storage would have to be considered.”
Source: Offshore Mag

Jacksonville LNG Project, Jacksonville, Florida, United States of America

Jacksonville LNG Project

The Jacksonville LNG project involves the construction of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) production, storage and export facility on St Johns River in Jacksonville, Florida, US.

The proposed facility will be owned and operated by Eagle LNG, a consortium of Clean Energy, GE Ventures, GE Energy Financial Services and Ferus Natural Gas Fuels. It will aim to meet high LNG demands of the vehicular and high-horsepower engine markets in the US.

Earlier conceived as a facility serving domestic markets, the proposed project plans to supply LNG to Caribbean and other overseas destinations. It will also provide fuel to ships cruising along the East Coast and other domestic commercial vehicles, making it the first terminal in the US to provide fuel for cargo ships.

Natural gas will be received and liquefied at the facility and LNG will be temporarily stored before being transported by ocean-going vessels, trucks and containers for export purposes and marine bunkering trade.

Construction on the project is expected to begin in the second quarter of 2017 and commissioning is scheduled for the fourth quarter of 2018. Expected operational life of the project is 30 years.

Site details of Jacksonville LNG project

“A marine load-out facility is planned to be built to handle small to mid-sized LNG vessels and bunkering barges.”

The facility will be constructed on approximately 197 acres (79.7ha) of land that is marked for industrial activity and hosts other bulk fuel terminals. Located in the same vicinity are Marathon Petroleum, Hess Corporation and US Navy fuel terminals.

Jacksonville LNG project infrastructure

The plant will feature three LNG trains with a production capacity of 300,000 gallons of LNG a train (approximately 0.18Mtpa).

One LNG storage tank with a capacity of eight million gallons (30,283m³) of total LNG storage and consisting of one large tank will be constructed as part of the proposed facility. Studies are ongoing on the feasibility of employing two smaller tanks with a capacity of four million gallons each.

A marine load-out facility is planned to be built to handle small to mid-sized LNG vessels and bunkering barges. Plans for the marine terminal include a land access pier with a T-headed structure located approximately 900ft offshore.

It will be situated off the north bank of St Johns River between the Marathon Petroleum marine terminal and the Navy Fuel Pier and immediately north of St Johns River Federal Channel.

Berthing and mooring facilities will ensure the accommodation of LNG vessels with capacities between 5,000m³ and 30,000m³.

Electrical energy for the facility will be supplied by Jacksonville area’s electric utility, Jacksonville Electric Authority.

An inlet boost compressor will be configured in the project facility to compress the feed gas from low pressure of natural gas distribution system (250psig) to the required feed pressure (650psig). The inlet boost compressor will be equipped with a motor-driven compressor.

Part of the LNG produced at the facility will be transported by trucks for road distribution to LNG fuelling stations in north Florida, the surrounding regions and states.

The capacity of LNG trucks used will be approximately 12,500 gallons (47m³). The LNG truck loading area will comprise cryogenic pipework (loading and vapour return) from LNG storage tank to the truck-loading area, flexible cryogenic hoses for filling, control panel, shelter and turning circle for LNG trucks.

Feed gas details for the Jacksonville LNG project



The new facility is expected to start operations in mid-2018.


Natural gas supplied to the project will be produced from reserves that currently supply two interstate pipelines that serve Jacksonville, the Florida Gas Transmission system and the Southern Natural Gas system.

Natural gas will be delivered to the project site by local distribution utility Peoples Gas. An existing pipeline of the utility will deliver to the project’s first train (25MMcf/d). The pipeline is planned to undergo expansion to supply natural gas to the remaining two trains.

Jacksonville LNG project benefits

The project was conceived to efficiently use the abundant supply of natural gas available in a cost-effective manner.

It will also impact the economies of Jacksonville and the state of Florida by creating jobs and increasing economic activity and exports. More than 102 jobs are expected to be created in the first ten years of the project.

Sourced by ekomeri.com

Ventilation system will increase air flow once installed

Ventilation system

Photo Courtesy of Department of Energy

A town hall meeting to discuss the recovery progress at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is being held this Thursday.

The town hall was postponed from taking place at the beginning of the month until this Thursday, due to a scheduling conflict.

The town hall will start art 5:30 p.m. at the Carlsbad City Council Chambers, and WIPP officials will discuss recent activities taking place at the repository in order to complete the recovery process.

Workers at WIPP are currently working on finishing the installation of the Interim Ventilation System.

According to a news release, workers at WIPP have poured concrete pads and the filter units have been installed on the concrete pads in their final positions.

The IVS is one part of the new ventilation system at WIPP that will ensure safety in case of radioactive release.

“In the event that work being performed in the underground would cause radioactive to become airborne, these filters are designed to capture the particles, preventing release to the environment,” the news release said.

The IVS consists of two fans that draw air from out of the underground and of High Efficiency Particulate Air filter units that filter the air in the underground before it is released into the environment.

Duct work also needs to be installed to connect the IVS to the existing ventilation system at the site.

The IVS will be used with already existing HEPA filters and fans at the facility, “significantly increasing the overall amount of airflow in the underground.”

With increased airflow in the WIPP underground it will increase the amount of work that can be down in the underground at once, as well as allow more diesel-fueled equipment to be used.

Sourced by ekomeri.com

Air Liquide awarded a new contract for the ITER project, strengthening its leadership in extreme cryogenics

Air Liquide announces the signature of a new contract with ITER-India for the design and manufacturing of 19 cryogenic lines for the ITER project. This latest contract comes after two earlier ones, signed in 2012 and in 2013, bringing to around 250 million euros the total amount signed by Air Liquide for the ITER project. This latest announcement illustrates Air Liquide’s leadership in extreme cryogenics for major scientific projects.

The objective of the international ITER project is to develop an experimental reactor in order to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion as a new source of energy. To obtain the very powerful electromagnetic fields required to confine and stabilize the fusion, it is necessary to use superconducting magnets that only function at extremely low temperatures.

The new cryogenic lines will transport helium at extremely low temperatures close to absolute zero in some cases (-269°C). Their fabrication requires the use of high tech processes and sophisticated design.

After having already completed the large scale cryogenic installations for the CERN1, Air Liquide, an expert in cryogenics, is a major industrial partner of the ITER project. It notably supplies the helium and nitrogen refrigerators used in ITER’s cryogenic plant, which will be the largest centralized refrigeration system ever built, as well as the 19 cryogenic lines.

François Darchis, member of the Air Liquide Executive Committee supervising Innovation, commented:We would like to thank ITER-India for its confidence. This success demonstrates once again the unique expertise of Air Liquide in the field of very low temperatures and its capacity to provide very high tech systems to address ambitious scientific challenges. Air Liquide is thus contributing to the major global scientific projects and to the development of the energy solutions of the future.

Prof. D. Bora, Director, Institute for Plasma Research, India, commented: ITER’s cryogenic system is one of the most complex systems known today after the CERN, and we are happy that Air Liquide is associated with us in this drive for fusion.

Sourced by ekomeri.com

DSME Completes Delivery of World’s First LNG-powered Container Ship

DSME, LNG-powered Container Ship DSME DSME Completes Delivery of World’s First LNG-powered Container Ship LNG Powered container

The world’s first container ship powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG), which has been built by Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME) with proprietary technology, has successfully completed a sea trial and will be put on an actual route.

According to an official at the DSME on Oct. 20, NASSCO, a subsidiary of leading U.S. defense company General Dynamics, recently delivered the Isla Bella, a 3,100 TEU container ship, to Totem Ocean Trailer Express (TOTE) Maritime after the completion of the sea trial. The ship is the world’s first LNG-powered container ship that includes patented technologies from the DSME and its subsidiaries.

The DSME generalized the basic design and supply of its own patented high-pressure LNG fuel gas supply system, while its subsidiary Shinhan Machinery was in charge of manufacturing equipment. Also, its design subsidiary DSEC took charge of the overall design and material package supply.

The LNG-powered system has lower emissions and increased fuel efficiency when compared to conventional diesel-powered ships. Accordingly, it is considered to be “the future of the shipbuilding industry.” The ship can reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 23 percent and sulfur oxide emissions by more than 95 percent compared to conventional ships using heavy fuel oil (HFO). Also, fuel consumption can be cut by nearly 35 percent. Based on its patents and technologies, the DSME has won more than 30 LNG carrier orders. The company boasts its unrivaled competitiveness in LNG-related technology.

In the process of the sea trial, the DSME proved its LNG gas supply system technology by successfully securing a stable supply of fuel. The system supplies high-pressure natural gas to the engine from the fuel tank, and it is considered a core technology in natural gas-powered ships. The DSME has secured price competitiveness through its high-pressure LNG vaporizing system and contributed greatly to the commercialization of natural gas as fuel for ships.

Sourced by ekomeri.com

ACD fuel gas system supplies LNG to Rasheeda engines on cue

LNG fuel systems LNG fuel systems ACD fuel gas system supplies LNG to Rasheeda engines on cue fuel gas system

ACD reports that its MSP-SL reciprocating, high-pressure pump system for the supply of LNG to the two engines onboard Rasheeda is performing well on the LNG carrier’s current historic voyage.

A Q-max vessel of 266,000m3, Rasheeda is the first LNG carrier with conventional diesel engines to have its propulsion system converted to dual-fuel running.

Rasheeda’s pair of newly configured, gas-burning, MAN ME-GI engines were commissioned on completion of the second phase of gas trials off the Spanish coast in mid-September. The vessel is now enroute from Qatar to the UK’s South Hook terminal with a cargo of LNG, its first following the engine conversion.

To date ACD has delivered 14 high-pressure and 25 low-pressure LNG fuel system for two and four-stroke marine propulsion engines. The Santa Ana, California-based firm also has a significant backlog of similar orders for delivery through 2017.

Rasheeda is one of 45 Q-flex and Q-max LNG carriers owned or part-owned by Nakilat of Qatar. The shipowner is reviewing the possibility of converting the conventional, two-stroke diesel engines of further vessels in this fleet to the ME-GI configuration.

Sourced by ekomeri.com

The world first LNG Fueled Container ship launches

The world first LNG fueled container ship has been launched at General Dynamics NASSCO in San Diego for operation by Sea Star Line in the U.S. mainland-Puerto Rico trade.

The Isla Bella is the first of two Marlin-class vessels ordered by Seattle-based TOTE Shipholdings Inc. The ships have dual-fuel engines that will operate primarily on liquefied natural gas but will be capable of burning diesel when needed.

Growing interest in LNG as a ship’s fuel is being driven by increasingly strict regulations on vessel emissions of sulpfur dioxide and other pollutants. Operators in emissions control zones off North American and European waters are the first to feel the impact of the stricter rules.

By switching to LNG, TOTE is reducing NOx emissions by 98 percent, SOx by 97 percent, carbon dioxide by 72 and particulate matter by 60 percent in the Puerto Rico trade.

Jacksonville LNG Project, Jacksonville, Florida, United States of America

Jacksonville LNG Project

The Jacksonville LNG project involves the construction of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) production, storage and export facility on St Johns River in Jacksonville, Florida, US.

The proposed facility will be owned and operated by Eagle LNG, a consortium of Clean Energy, GE Ventures, GE Energy Financial Services and Ferus Natural Gas Fuels. It will aim to meet high LNG demands of the vehicular and high-horsepower engine markets in the US.

Earlier conceived as a facility serving domestic markets, the proposed project plans to supply LNG to Caribbean and other overseas destinations. It will also provide fuel to ships cruising along the East Coast and other domestic commercial vehicles, making it the first terminal in the US to provide fuel for cargo ships.

Natural gas will be received and liquefied at the facility and LNG will be temporarily stored before being transported by ocean-going vessels, trucks and containers for export purposes and marine bunkering trade.

Construction on the project is expected to begin in the second quarter of 2017 and commissioning is scheduled for the fourth quarter of 2018. Expected operational life of the project is 30 years.

Site details of Jacksonville LNG project

“A marine load-out facility is planned to be built to handle small to mid-sized LNG vessels and bunkering barges.”

The facility will be constructed on approximately 197 acres (79.7ha) of land that is marked for industrial activity and hosts other bulk fuel terminals. Located in the same vicinity are Marathon Petroleum, Hess Corporation and US Navy fuel terminals.

Jacksonville LNG project infrastructure

The plant will feature three LNG trains with a production capacity of 300,000 gallons of LNG a train (approximately 0.18Mtpa).

One LNG storage tank with a capacity of eight million gallons (30,283m³) of total LNG storage and consisting of one large tank will be constructed as part of the proposed facility. Studies are ongoing on the feasibility of employing two smaller tanks with a capacity of four million gallons each.

A marine load-out facility is planned to be built to handle small to mid-sized LNG vessels and bunkering barges. Plans for the marine terminal include a land access pier with a T-headed structure located approximately 900ft offshore.

It will be situated off the north bank of St Johns River between the Marathon Petroleum marine terminal and the Navy Fuel Pier and immediately north of St Johns River Federal Channel.

Berthing and mooring facilities will ensure the accommodation of LNG vessels with capacities between 5,000m³ and 30,000m³.

Electrical energy for the facility will be supplied by Jacksonville area’s electric utility, Jacksonville Electric Authority.

An inlet boost compressor will be configured in the project facility to compress the feed gas from low pressure of natural gas distribution system (250psig) to the required feed pressure (650psig). The inlet boost compressor will be equipped with a motor-driven compressor.

Part of the LNG produced at the facility will be transported by trucks for road distribution to LNG fuelling stations in north Florida, the surrounding regions and states.

The capacity of LNG trucks used will be approximately 12,500 gallons (47m³). The LNG truck loading area will comprise cryogenic pipework (loading and vapour return) from LNG storage tank to the truck-loading area, flexible cryogenic hoses for filling, control panel, shelter and turning circle for LNG trucks.

Feed gas details for the Jacksonville LNG project



The new facility is expected to start operations in mid-2018.


Natural gas supplied to the project will be produced from reserves that currently supply two interstate pipelines that serve Jacksonville, the Florida Gas Transmission system and the Southern Natural Gas system.

Natural gas will be delivered to the project site by local distribution utility Peoples Gas. An existing pipeline of the utility will deliver to the project’s first train (25MMcf/d). The pipeline is planned to undergo expansion to supply natural gas to the remaining two trains.

Jacksonville LNG project benefits

The project was conceived to efficiently use the abundant supply of natural gas available in a cost-effective manner.

It will also impact the economies of Jacksonville and the state of Florida by creating jobs and increasing economic activity and exports. More than 102 jobs are expected to be created in the first ten years of the project.

Sourced by ekomeri.com